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  • I started going to church in second grade, so I’ve been hearing about Jesus and grace for as long as I can remember. I could recite the mantra of grace long before it became something I understood I needed.  It’s an undeserved gift. One we open with a beaming grin and a genuine, heart felt, “Thank you!” We wear it proudly, stand behind it whenever we need it to cover our biggest mistakes and shortcomings. “Thank God for grace,” we say. It’s how we tell everyone else about this big, awesome, loving God we’ve met.  It is the bottom line, focal point of the gospel.


  • We are excited about reading the book of Joshua together this fall in our sermon series called the Gospel in Joshua: Seeing Christ in the Old Testament promises.  We are committed to teaching the whole of Scripture and there are three particular things that will be helpful for you in this book...


  • In 2010 I had my heart broken. It was my first “L”-word, adult relationship, and I was blindsided and dumbfounded by her decision that things weren’t going to work out.

     

    That sob story in and of itself is rather unremarkable. Most of us have been down that road. We know how the anger, bargaining, and denial feels.

     

    What I’d like to discuss is what happened after that… or rather what didn’t happen...


  • Over the past two years volunteering with Redemption Kids Ministry, and now as the Director of Kids Ministry, the distinction between “childlike” and “childish” have become more apparent than ever to me. I normally work with the 2nd to 5th graders but I engage with all the kids from toddlers up to 10 year olds when we have the large group lesson. The childish behaviors are very easy to see: immaturity, selfishness, being obnoxious, stealing goldfish. These are the types of behaviors we hope children will learn to put past them and grow out of...


  • Tradition is good in so much that it points to Christ and connects with the saints of history. We must ask: what traditions are we establishing and upholding?...


  • Throughout school, I always knew what was coming next. Elementary school, then middle school, high school, college, and then graduate school. Now that I’m done with graduate school, I don’t know what is coming next. I’ve always been a high achiever, so to be currently unemployed and waiting on a license that may take another few months to come through feels awkward. No one is telling me how to spend my time, but I still feel the need to answer for it. I find myself making lists of all the productive things I’ve accomplished. I feel the need to prove my worth through how productive I was in a day, but I’ve found that no one really cares. It’s all in my mind. Productivity does not equal worth...


  • The initial call to Christ is a somewhat straightforward message, but once we step down from that mountaintop and are forced back into real life, the not-so-straightforward question rises to the surface: "I'm a believer... now what?” The answer is discipleship...


  • When I started attending Redemption, I knew I wanted to get involved with a ministry team.  Based on my past experience and interests, I decided to join the worship team. I’ve grown up with a love for music, and my favorite way to worship is through music – whether that means leading with the worship band at church, or playing worship music while I’m at work or in the car...


  • In 8th grade, Mr. Gilchrist asked us what we wanted to be when we grew up. Most my classmates had real answers, but I just said “I want to be happy.”...