BLOG


  • This past Sunday, we looked at two of the biggest obstacles in studying the Bible: discipline and recall.

     

    Some of you may feel significant challenge in getting a consistent time in the Word. Some of you may be in the Word, but are unable to recall, or feel forgetful of what you've read in recent time.

     

    In both cases, we need to be reminded of the holiness of God and power of the text to transform and shape our lives.


  • The Vision and Prayer Breakfast is one of our favorite Sundays of the year. We get an opportunity to look back at the previous year, look ahead into the new year, and join together in prayer.

     

    Take a look at what we reviewed. 


  • Eating is a significant theme throughout the entire Bible. From the feasts and festivals of the Old Testament, to the meal Jesus shares with his disciples the night before he dies, and the final feast in heaven, the Bible affirms a great joy and delight as God's people eat together.

    Many of your Christmas traditions involve food and family. Last Sunday, we remembered the practice of feasting together as a joy-filled, Christ-centered, hope-reminding activity. Our hope is that as we eat, we would never forget the giver of food and life who is at the center of it all!


  • Our society preaches maximum comfort and quick fixes to deeper rooted issues. How often do we ground ourselves in self-preservation and false senses of earthly security only to be startled at how quickly the next storm comes? The analogy found in Matthew 7:24-27 speaks to the eternal security that comes in knowing Christ, doing his work, and establishing Him at the center as opposed to just being a listener:


  • Waiting is a universal experience during the holiday season. We are waiting for packages, waiting in lines, we are waiting in traffic. 

    So what if we saw this everyday experience as an opportunity to be reminded of what it means to wait for God? Waiting is a massive theme of the Bible, as we see God's people being constantly hopeful and expectant for God to come and restore the kingdom.


  • Last Sunday was the start of Advent. Advent means "coming" in Latin and is a period of time we dedicate to celebrating the coming of the Messiah, Christ Jesus. We often feel a tension this time of year between our desire to draw near to God and enjoy his peace and presence, and the frenzied bustle of holiday festivities and end-of-year chores.  

    "A Simple Christmas" is a time to direct our hearts to delight in Jesus. 

    These are serious questions, and we're glad we can have this conversation. 


  • There has been a great turnaround in the media around the challenges of mental health with a growing awareness of how significant this space is for overall health that spans across so many sectors of our world. But what does the Bible say about mental health and mental illness? Can Christians struggle with depression and anxiety? Is there physical medical healing we should pursue, or should we just trust Jesus?

    These are serious questions, and we're glad we can have this conversation. 


  • The simple meaning of Christmas is that God came to be with us. And as we’ve celebrated God’s presence, we’ve also added layers upon layers of extra activities that have kept us from enjoying the original focus, Christ with us. But in our layering, it’s possible for us to get distracted with the things of Christmas and miss God in Christmas.


  • One of the hottest topics in the world today centers around sexual identity and expression. And one of the the highest ideals and values of our culture today is having a fulfilling and satisfying romantic relationship.

    The church doesn't often speak into these areas, but the Bible speaks to the most important identity we have, that we are made in the image of God.


  • I feared the world. I sought the world. I wanted the acceptance of the world.

     

    But then God moved, and my heart changed.